The Goddamn ‘Suits’ Drinking Game

Grab your favourite beverage; this is the official Suits Goddamn Drinking Game for viewers at Château Bonwâg.

When Someone Says This…

  1. “Goddamn.” – one shot
    • Bonus shot if it’s weirdly awkward e.g. “You can goddamn pay for this coffee.”
  2. “What are you doing here?” – one shot
  3. “You have my word… / I promise you…” – one shot
  4. “What is this?” – one shot
  5. “If anyone asks…” – one shot
  6. “This conversation is over.” – two shots
  7. “Is that a threat?” – two shots
  8. “It didn’t come from me.” – two shots
  9. “Now, if you’ll excuse me…” – two shots
  10. “Sh*t the bed.” – two shots
  11. “You’re going to want to hear what I have to say.” – three shots

When This Happens…

  1. The first word of the scene is a character’s name – one shot
  2. A character hands someone a folder without explaining what is in it – one shot
  3. An elevator closes on someone – one shot
  4. Someone buttons or unbuttons their suit – one shot
  5. A judge allows a clear case of contempt in their courtroom, after pointing it out and warning against it – two shots
  6. Two characters meet on a rooftop with a CGI background – three shots
  7. The third time someone uses a movie reference in the same episode – three shots
  8. It’s raining in NYC – have a coffee (this never happens)

 

 

Advertisements

Eurovision 2017 – My Predictions

This Internet Thing Might Be Catching On

Apparently, 10 years and 1 week ago today, my first Facebook post was “taking a break @ home”.

Still using both. (First tweet was 10 years and 2 weeks ago : https://twitter.com/bonwag/status/8121611)

Many services have come and gone (MySpace deserved to die, Google Wave didn’t ) and these two have become something very different from what they were, but I think this internet fad might stick around for a while longer.

The Student has become The Master

The results are finally in; my MBA studies are complete, and I beat my 75% target, so I’ve got that going for me, which is nice.

Many thanks to my long-suffering Ainslie (for all the coffee, hugs, and cheers), my family and my MBA teammates (here and abroad) for their support, lo these last 3 and a half years.

We now return to regular programming; I’ll graduate in early 2016, and am still loving my work at CA. There are a few MBA-sized holes in my schedule that will need to be filled… stay tuned!

For now; time for a break. Zum Wohl!

Sebastian’s Animal Joke Vote

Hey, internet – Sebastian needs help selecting the bestest animal joke for school.

Your votes (or extra contributions) would be greatly appreciated!

Joke 1

What happened to the tap dancing spider? He fell into the sink

Joke 2

Two penguins are chilling in Antarctica.
First penguin says, “You look like you’re wearing a tuxedo.”
Second penguin says, “Who says I’m not?”

Joke 3

Knock Knock
Who’s there?
Hoo
Hoo Who?
I didn’t know an owl lived here

Australia’s Eurovision Voting Bloc – Our Experts Thought Russia Was Best

Let's all agree to ignore Amanda

Let’s all agree to ignore Amanda

We almost gave it to the Ruskies, but Australia’s voting public wasn’t having it. Good thing we have a jury, though.

There were some twists in the way Australia voted this year, aside from the technical glitches that you can bank on (mostly PICNIC errors). Behind the interminable live crosses, a lot of Aussies might not have been aware of the jury system that Eurovision presses into action in most countries; it’s 50% people, 50% jury. In Australia we had:

  • Amanda Pelman – the music industry exec who gave Kylie a job,
  • Richard Wilkins – the violin-playing kiwi who pops up on Channel Nine to talk about entertaining things,
  • Danielle Spencer – the singer/actor who has/had to put up with Russell Crowe,
  • Ash London – the TV presenter who used to interrupt the videos on The Loop, and
  • Jake Stone – the shirtless one from Bluejuice.

And the actual voting stats show there were some interesting discussions held between these experts at some point:

  • The jury actually wanted Russia to get our top vote, but the people ranked Russia at 7, most likely by engaging in that terrible ‘voting bloc‘ behaviour that Australia has bitched about from the sidelines all these years. We eventually agreed on placing Russia second as a nation.
  • Pelman was seriously out of step, wanting the UK in the top 5 (it finished 18th in our vote) and awarding Belgium ‘nil points’ when a few other judges, and the public, placed them second (it finished 8th in our vote).
  • The judges disagreed with the people about Azerbaijan (they wanted them 6th, we placed them last, probably just as well, too) and Norway (they wanted Norway 3rd, we voted them 10th)

So, let’s get some math going; each of our judges gets an ‘agreement score’ with the Australian public based on how well their ranking matches the popular vote.

Amanda scores a lowly 55%, Dickie gets 60%, Jake gets 61%, Danielle gets 67%, and Ash gets 76%.

I hereby declare Ash London as our most representative jury member – at 76% she was most in agreement with what the Australian public wanted.

But how did the judges – and the Australian public – fare compared to the result?

The judges’ agreement with the final ranking was about the same; Amanda the worst at 58%, Ash the best at 73%. Ash was actually better than the public vote, who got it 72% right – but the judges as a whole let us down with a score of 66%. The good news is that our submission to the Eurovision count had a 78% agreement with the final ranking, meaning the joint efforts of The Jury and The People were better than either of us alone.

Moral of the story; the jury might be worse than the public at predicting the result, but we do better by combining our results. And Ash seems to know Eurovision pretty well (better than Amanda, anyway).

Agreement with Final Eurovision 2015 Result